Lakewood Animal Hospital

36097 Goodwin Dr.
Locust Grove, VA 22508

(540)972-2203

lakewoodanimalhospital.org

Vaccination Information

Canine Vaccines

RABIES - Rabies is a lethal viral disease spread by a bite from an infected animal. The state of Virginia requires all cats and dogs to be current on rabies vaccination. This is also a zoonotic disease which means that infected animals can infect humans as well. For this reason the state takes rabies vaccination very seriously and so do we! This vaccine is given after 12 weeks of age and then boosted at one year of age and then every three years.


DISTEMPER - (Includes Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza) The distemper vaccine is recommended for all dogs. Distemper causes ocular and nasal discharge and can progress to coughing, pneumonia, vomiting, diarrhea and neurological signs. Parvovirus causes severe and often fatal vomiting and diarrhea. Parainfluenza can cause respiratory disease and adenovirus can cause hepatits. Distemper vaccines are given every three weeks from six to 16 weeks of age and then boosted at one year then every three years.



LEPTO -
Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection acquired by exposure to contaminated urine or soil. The animals which serve as the reservoirs for the bacteria include dogs, rodents, raccoons, skunks, opossums, cattle and swine. Lepto causes fever, joint pain, lethargy and eventually kidney or liver failure. After initial vaccination, this vaccine is boosted three weeks later and then annually. This vaccine is recommended if your dog spends time outside running free, hunting, camping, hiking or if he/she spends time in the country, near livestock, rivers or lakes.


LYME- Dogs are infected with Lyme disease after being bitten by a tick. Up to 95% of dogs infected with Lyme remain asymptomatic. Of the dogs that become symptomatic, most dogs become lethargic and suffer from joint pain, although a very small percentage may develop severe kidney damage. After initial vaccination, this vaccine is boosted at three weeks and then annually. The Lyme vaccine is recommended if your dog spends time outdoors and especially if your dog has long, thick or dark colored hair making tick identification even more difficult.


BORDETELLA - Bordetella is often referred to as kennel cough. This vaccine is boosted annually although some kennels require it every six months. The Bordetella vaccine is recommended if your dog comes in contact with other dogs on walks or at parks or visits boarding/grooming facilities or dog shows.

Feline Vaccines

RABIES - Rabies is a lethal viral disease spread by the bites from an infected animal. The state of Virginia requires all cats and dogs to be current on rabies vaccination. This is also a zoonotic disease which means that infected animals can infect humans as well. For this reason the state takes rabies vaccination very seriously and so do we! This vaccine is given after 12 weeks of age and then boosted every year.


DISTEMPER- (FVRCP=Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calicivirus & Panleukopenia) The distemper vaccine in cats immunizes for panleukopenia which causes vomiting and diarrhea which is often fatal. It also immunizes for viral rhinotracheitis and calicivirus which are common causes of upper respiratory disease. This is given every three weeks until 16 weeks of age and then boosted at one year of age and then every three years. This vaccine is recommended for all cats.


FELINE LEUKEMIA - Feline leukemia is transmitted to kittens during pregnancy or from infected blood or saliva of an infected cat contaminating the eye, mouth or nose of an uninfected cat. The infection causes severe bone marrow disease or cancer and is often fatal within a few years of diagnosis. After initial vaccination this vaccine is boosted at three weeks and then annually. The American Association of Feline Practitioners "highly recommends" all kittens get the initial two vaccines since kittens are so susceptible to this virus. This way if the kitten escapes or becomes and outdoor kitty they will be protected. They recommend discontinuing the vaccine at one year of age if the cat's lifestyle does not put them in a high risk cateogry (outside cat or exposure to FELV positive cat.)

 

COMMON VACCINE QUESTIONS!


Why do I need to vaccinate my indoor cat for rabies?

Very simply... it is the law. Virginia state law requires all cats and dogs over 4 months of age have a current rabies vaccination. This law is to help keep the public safe since rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease. If your pet is not current on its vaccination we are unable to continue to be their healthcare provider.

What are the potential side effects or complications of vaccination?

An allergic reaction might include hives, facial swelling or nausea and vomiting. These types of reactions are usually easily treated. Very rarely an animal may have a more serious reaction which can include shock or sudden death. Most vaccine reactions happen almost immediately however sometimes reactions can occur up to 48 hours.